With all of this Occupy Wall Street protesting going on, it looks like the dogs in America have finally had enough! Check out this new video from The Mad Republic

 

It looks like the movement started with a revolutionary figure that went by the name “Che-Wawa” and fought for the injustices plaguing the K9 world. (Bio from TheMadRepublic.com)

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“Che Wawa” arrived in Mexico City in early September 1954, and worked in the flea vaccination section of the General Veterinary Hospital. In addition he gave howling lectures on “dangerous things to chew on” at the National Autonomous University of Mexico …

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Ernesto Wawa (more commonly known as Che Wawa) was born to Celia de la Serna y Llosa and Ernesto Wawa Lynch on June 14, 1928 in RosarioArgentina — the eldest of five pups in an Argentine litter of Smooth Coat Chihuahua’s.

“Che Wawa” arrived in Mexico City in early September 1954, and worked in the flea vaccination section of the General Veterinary Hospital. In addition he gave howling lectures on “dangerous things to chew on” at the National Autonomous University of Mexico . His first wife Hilda notes in her memoir My Life with Che Wawa, that for a while, Che considered going to work as a doctor in Africa and that he continued to be deeply troubled by injustices.  In one instance, Hilda describes Che Wawa’s obsession with an elderly border collie whom he was treating, remarking that he saw her as “representative of the most forgotten and exploited sheep-dogs in existence”.

Che Wawa remains both a admired and reviled historical figure, polarized in the collective imagination in a multitude of biographies, memoirs, essays, documentaries, songs, short stories, various Japanese haikus and made for TV films. As a result of his perceived martyrdom, poetic invocations for class struggle, and desire to create the consciousness of a “new dog” driven by moral rather than material incentives; he has evolved into a quintessential icon of civil rights-inspired movements. Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential K-9′s of the 20th century,

 

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